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How to Perform Doublet Discrimination In Flow Cytometry

How to Perform Doublet Discrimination In Flow Cytometry

By: Tim Bushnell, PhD

You are probably familiar with the term, “doublet discrimination” or “doublet exclusion”, and have likely included this flow cytometry measurement into at least some (if not all) of your gating strategies. Even though you may utilize this important gating strategy, you may not have had the chance to delve deeper to explore exactly what doublets are and why it’s critical to exclude them. This article aims to give you insight on the what, why, and how of doublet discrimination.

What Is A Fluorescence Minus One, or FMO Control

What Is A Fluorescence Minus One, or FMO Control

By: Tim Bushnell, PhD

The Fluorescence Minus One Control, or FMO control is a type of control used to properly interpret flow cytometry data.  It is used to identify and gate cells in the context of data spread due to the multiple fluorochromes in a given panel. An FMO control contains all the flurochromes in a panel, except for the one that is being measured.  For example, in the four color panel, there would be four separate FMO controls, as shown in the table below. The FMO control ensures that the any spread of the fluorochromes into the channel of interest is properly identified.…

How To Analyze FACS Data And Prepare Flow Cytometry Figures For Scientific Papers

How To Analyze FACS Data And Prepare Flow Cytometry Figures For Scientific Papers

By: Tim Bushnell, PhD

When preparing figures for publication, the scientific question and hypothesis that forms the basis of the paper must be central and all the figures must be in support of that. The flow cytometry data that forms the basis of the conclusions should be presented clearly and concisely. While it provides pretty pictures and colorful layouts, the meat of the data are the numbers ― percentages of populations, fluorescent intensity levels and the like ― are what will convince the reader that the hypothesis tested is valid and well thought out. Here’s how to choose the correct flow figure for presenting your data.

When To Use (And Not Use) Flow Cytometry Isotype Controls

When To Use (And Not Use) Flow Cytometry Isotype Controls

By: Tim Bushnell, PhD

The field of flow cytometry is moving beyond the use of isotype controls, with many suggesting they be left out of nearly all experiments. Yet, isotype controls were once considered the only negative controls you should ever use. They are still very often included by some labs, almost abandoned by others, and a subject of confusion for many beginners. What are they, why and when do I need them? Are they of any use at all, or just a waste of money? Most importantly, why do reviewers keep asking for them when they review papers containing flow data? Here is everything you need to know about using (or not using) isotype controls in your next flow cytometry experiment.

3 Flow Cytometry Gates That Will Improve The Accuracy Of Your FACS Data Analysis

3 Flow Cytometry Gates That Will Improve The Accuracy Of Your FACS Data Analysis

By: Tim Bushnell, PhD

When training new users on data analysis, there are several different best practices and gating strategies you should incorporate into your analysis. There are also several misconceptions you must understand. There are 3 gates that many researchers are not using but should be using when analyzing their flow cytometry data. These gates are critical for good data analysis. They will help remove many confounding events that may be clouding your analysis, especially where rare events are concerned.

5 Essential Calculations For Accurate Flow Cytometry Results

5 Essential Calculations For Accurate Flow Cytometry Results

By: Tim Bushnell, PhD

Flow cytometry is a numbers game. There are percentages of a population, fluorescence intensity measurements, sample averages, data normalization, and more. Many of these common calculations are useful, but surrounded by misconceptions. This primer will help you decide which calculation to use, when to use it, and how to interpret the results.

How To Set And Monitor Optimal Voltages For A Flow Cytometry Experiment

How To Set And Monitor Optimal Voltages For A Flow Cytometry Experiment

By: Tim Bushnell, PhD

The best way to take out the fear and agony of setting voltages is to use some optimization methods. The peak 2 method is a useful and robust method of identifying optimal PMT voltage ranges. Refining that to the voltage walk with the actual cells and fluorochromes of interest will further improve sensitivity, which is especially critical for rare cell populations or emergent antigens. This article describes how to set up, monitor, and maintain optimal voltage settings for your flow cytometry experiment.

Why You Need To Use FMO Controls For All Multicolor Flow Cytometry Experiments

Why You Need To Use FMO Controls For All Multicolor Flow Cytometry Experiments

By: Tim Bushnell, PhD

FMO controls are samples that contain all the antibodies you are testing in your experimental samples, minus one of them. When analyzing the minus, or left out parameter in an FMO control, you give yourself a strong negative control to work with. It’s a strong negative control because the left out marker in the FMO control allows you to take into account how the other stains in your panel affect the respective minus parameter. Many flow cytometry gates are difficult to define. This is especially true when you’re looking at activation markers within a continuum or accounting for the large data spread that occurs when compensating a 10+ color experiment. The only way to convince reviewers that your gate is in the proper place is by using FMO controls. Here's why you need to use FMO controls for any multicolor flow cytometry experiment and how to prepare these controls properly.

5 Gating Strategies To Get Your Flow Cytometry Data Published In Peer-Reviewed Scientific Journals

5 Gating Strategies To Get Your Flow Cytometry Data Published In Peer-Reviewed Scientific Journals

By: Tim Bushnell, PhD

When sitting down to perform a new analysis of flow cytometry data, the researcher is guided by very particular laws of nature and a very specific method of working through a biological hypothesis to avoid shaping the results to his or her whims. Following these 5 data analysis and gating strategies through the hierarchy described in this article, researchers are provided with several strategies for identifying and displaying the most relevant data from their flow cytometry experiments.

4 Biggest Mistakes Scientists Make During Multicolor Flow Cytometry Cell Sorting Experiments

4 Biggest Mistakes Scientists Make During Multicolor Flow Cytometry Cell Sorting Experiments

By: Tim Bushnell, PhD

Multicolor sorting experiments can be complicated and if not setup properly, result in wasted time and suboptimal results. When setting up a multicolor experiment, the most saliently critical step is to set PMT voltages properly. In addition, using a viability dye and addressing doublet discrimination and setting the right sort regions and gates is important for any kind of flow cytometry experiment, but particularly for cell sorting. These tips help to ensure your setup is perfect to achieve results of the highest caliber.

What Is Flow Cytometry Light Scatter And How Cell Size And Particle Size Affects It

What Is Flow Cytometry Light Scatter And How Cell Size And Particle Size Affects It

By: Tim Bushnell, PhD

Forward scatter detectors collect light at small angles relative to the incident beam and can take advantage of the fact that cells preferentially scatter light in this “forward” direction. Forward scattered light is traditionally and often effectively measured with a photodiode, rather than the more sensitive photomultiplier used to measure fluorescence and side scatter. Scatter gets dim very quickly when particles have diameters below the wavelength of illuminating light, considering that scatter intensity decreases with a dependence on r6 of the particle. Here’s how small particles affect light scatter.

What Is Sheath Fluid

What Is Sheath Fluid

By: Tim Bushnell, PhD

Sheath fluid is the solution that runs in a flow cytometer.  Once the sheath fluid is running at laminar flow, the cells are injected into the center of the stream, at a slightly higher pressure.  The principles of hydrodynamic focusing cause the cells to align, single file in the direction of flow. Depending on experimental needs, different formulations of sheath fluid can be used. Many labs purchase pre-mixed phosphate-buffered saline from Leinco Technologies. Some researchers use Hepes-buffered saline.  This is particularly useful for high-pressure cell sorting as Hepes controls pH better at high pressure than phosphate buffers do. Finally, since…

Recent Articles

Which Fluorophores To Use For Your Microscopy Experiment

Which Fluorophores To Use For Your Microscopy Experiment

By: Heather Brown-Harding, PhD

Fluorophore selection is important. I have often been asked by my facility users which fluorophore is best suited for their experiments. The answer to this is mostly dependent on whether they are using a widefield microscope with set excitation/emission cubes or a laser based system that lets you select the laser and the emission window. Once you have narrowed down which fluorophores you can excite and collect the correct emission, you can further refine the specific fluorophore that is best for your experiment.  In this blog  we will discuss how to determine what can work with your microscope, and how…

How To Optimize Instrument Voltage For Flow Cytometry Experiments  (Part 3 Of 6)

How To Optimize Instrument Voltage For Flow Cytometry Experiments (Part 3 Of 6)

By: Tim Bushnell, PhD

As we continue to explore the steps involved in optimizing a flow cytometry experiment, we turn our attention to the detectors and optimizing sensitivity: instrument voltage optimization.  This is important as we want to ensure that we can make as sensitive a measurement as possible.  This requires us to know the optimal sensitivity of our instrument, and how our stained cells are resolved based on that voltage.  Let’s start by asking the question what makes a good voltage?  Joe Trotter, from the BD Biosciences Advanced Technology Group, once suggested the following:  Electronic noise effects resolution sensitivity   A good minimal PMT…

How To Profile DNA And RNA Expression Using Next Generation Sequencing (Part-2)

How To Profile DNA And RNA Expression Using Next Generation Sequencing (Part-2)

By: Deepak Kumar, PhD

In the first blog of this series, we explored the power of sequencing the genome at various levels. We also dealt with how the characterization of the RNA expression levels helps us to understand the changes at the genome level. These changes impact the downstream expression of the target genes. In this blog, we will explore how NGS sequencing can help us comprehend DNA modification that affect the expression pattern of the given genes (epigenetic profiling) as well as characterizing the DNA-protein interactions that allow for the identification of genes that may be regulated by a given protein.  DNA Methylation Profiling…

4 No Cost Ways To Improve Your Microscopy Image Quality

4 No Cost Ways To Improve Your Microscopy Image Quality

By: Heather Brown-Harding, PhD

Image quality is critical for accurate and reproducible data. Many people get stuck on the magnification of the objective or on using a confocal instead of a widefield microscope. There are several other factors that affect the image quality such as the numerical aperture of the objective, the signal-to-noise ratio of the system, or the brightness of the sample.  Numerical aperture is the ability of an objective to collect light from a sample, but it contributes to two key formulas that will affect your image quality. The first is the theoretical resolution of the objective. It is expressed with the…

How To Profile DNA And RNA Expression Using Next Generation Sequencing

How To Profile DNA And RNA Expression Using Next Generation Sequencing

By: Deepak Kumar, PhD

Why is Next Generation Sequencing so powerful to explore and answer both clinical and research questions. With the ability to sequence whole genomes, identifying novel changes between individuals, to exploring what RNA sequences are being expressed, or to examine DNA modifications and protein-DNA interactions occurring that can help researchers better understand the complex regulation of transcription. This, in turn, allows them to characterize changes during different disease states, which can suggest a way to treat said disease.  Over the next two blogs, I will highlight these different methods along with illustrating how these can help clinical diagnostics as well as…

Optimizing Flow Cytometry Experiments - Part 2         How To Block Samples (Sample Blocking)

Optimizing Flow Cytometry Experiments - Part 2 How To Block Samples (Sample Blocking)

By: Tim Bushnell, PhD

In my previous blog on  experimental optimization, we discussed the idea of identifying the best antibody concentration for staining the cells. We did this through a process called titration, which  focuses on finding the best signal-to-noise ratio at the lowest antibody concentration. In this blog we will deal with sample blocking As a reminder, there are two other major binding concerns with antibodies. The first is the specific binding of the Fc fragment of the antibody to the Fc Receptor expressed on some cells. This protein is critical for the process of destroying microbes or other cells that have been…

What Is Total Internal Reflection Fluorescence (TIRF) Microscopy & Is It Right For You?

What Is Total Internal Reflection Fluorescence (TIRF) Microscopy & Is It Right For You?

By: Heather Brown-Harding, PhD

TIRF is not as common as other microscopy based techniques due to certain restrictions. We will discuss these restrictions, then analyze why it might be perfect for your experiment.  TIRF relies on an evanescent wave, created through a critical angle of coherent light (i.e. laser) that reaches a refractive index mismatch.  What does it mean in practice?  A high angle laser reflects off the interface of the coverslip and the sample. Although the depth that this wave penetrates is dependent on the wavelength of the light, in practice it is approximately 50-300nm from the coverslip. Therefore, the cell membrane is…

What Is Next Generation Sequencing (NGS) And How Is It Used In Drug Development

What Is Next Generation Sequencing (NGS) And How Is It Used In Drug Development

By: Deepak Kumar, PhD

NGS methodologies have been used to produce high-throughput sequence data. These data with appropriate computational analyses facilitate variant identification and prove to be extremely valuable in pharmaceutical industries and clinical practice for developing drug molecules inhibiting disease progression. Thus, by providing a comprehensive profile of an individual’s variome — particularly that of clinical relevance consisting of pathogenic variants — NGS helps in determining new disease genes. The information thus obtained on genetic variations and the target disease genes can be used by the Pharma companies to develop drugs impeding these variants and their disease-causing effect. However simple this may allude…

How To Determine The Optimal Antibody Concentration For Your Flow Cytometry Experiment (Part 1 of 6)

How To Determine The Optimal Antibody Concentration For Your Flow Cytometry Experiment (Part 1 of 6)

By: Tim Bushnell, PhD

Over the next series of blog posts, we will explore the different aspects of optimizing a polychromatic flow cytometry panel. These steps range from figuring out the best voltage to use, which controls are critical for data interpretation, what quality control tools can be integrated into the assay; how to block cells, and more. This blog will focus on determining the optimal antibody concentration.  As a reminder about the antibody structure, a schematic of an antibody is shown below.  Figure 1: Schematic of an antibody. Figure from Wikipedia. The antibody is composed of two heavy chains and two light chains that…

5 Drool Worthy Imaging Advances Of 2020

5 Drool Worthy Imaging Advances Of 2020

By: Heather Brown-Harding, PhD

2020 was a difficult year for many, with their own research being interrupted- either by lab shutdowns or recruitment into the race against COVID-19. Despite the challenges, scientists have continued to be creative and have pushed the boundaries of what is possible. These are the techniques and technologies that every microscopist was envious of in 2020. Spatially Resolved Transcriptomics Nature Methods declared that spatially resolved transcriptomics was the 2020 method of the year. These are a  group of methods that combine gene expression with their physical location. Single-cell RNA sequencing (scRNAseq) was originally developed for cells that had been dissociated…

Structural Variant Calling From NGS Data

Structural Variant Calling From NGS Data

By: Deepak Kumar, PhD

Single Nucleotide Variant (SNVs) have been considered as the main source of genetic variation, therefore precisely identifying these SNVs is a critical part of the Next Generation Sequencing (NGS) workflow. However, in this report from 2004, the authors identified another form of variants called the Structural Variants (SVs), which are genetic alterations of 50 or more base pairs, and result in duplications, deletions, insertions, inversions, and translocations in the genome. The changes in the DNA organization resulting from these SVs have been shown to be responsible for both phenotypic variation and a variety of pathological conditions. While the average variation,…

2020 - A Year Turned Upside Down

2020 - A Year Turned Upside Down

By: Tim Bushnell, PhD

What an incredible year 2020 has been. It started off like any other year and bam SARS-CoV-2 (aka COVID 19) entered the equation, bringing chaos and havoc to the world. Things kept changing overnight as new rules and regulations popped up. Masking, quarantine, and flatten the curve became common words in the news. How we met, how we interacted changed almost overnight. Throughout all of this, as we look to 2021, there is hope and optimism. Multiple vaccines have been developed, building on years of research into the SARS-CoV virus, with some approved for human use, and others on the horizon.…

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Top Technical Training eBooks

Get the Advanced Microscopy eBook

Get the Advanced Microscopy eBook

Heather Brown-Harding, PhD

Learn the best practices and advanced techniques across the diverse fields of microscopy, including instrumentation, experimental setup, image analysis, figure preparation, and more.

Get The Free Modern Flow Cytometry eBook

Get The Free Modern Flow Cytometry eBook

Tim Bushnell, PhD

Learn the best practices of flow cytometry experimentation, data analysis, figure preparation, antibody panel design, instrumentation and more.

Get The Free 4-10 Compensation eBook

Get The Free 4-10 Compensation eBook

Tim Bushnell, PhD

Advanced 4-10 Color Compensation, Learn strategies for designing advanced antibody compensation panels and how to use your compensation matrix to analyze your experimental data.