4 – Experimental Design

Combining Flow Cytometry With Plant Science, Microorganisms, And The Environment

By: Tim Bushnell, PhD

My first introduction to flow cytometry was talking to a professor who’d brought one on a research cruise to study phytoplankton. It was only later that I was introduced to the marvelous world that’s been my career for over 20 years.   In that time, I’ve had the opportunity to work with researchers in many different areas, exposing me to a wide variety of cell types and more important assays. What continues to amaze me is the number of different parameters we can measure, not just the number of fluorochromes, but the information we can extract from samples – animal, vegetable…

Common Numbers-Based Questions I Get As A Flow Cytometry Core Manager And How To Answer Them

By: Tim Bushnell, PhD

Numbers are all around us.  My personal favorite is ≅1.618 aka ɸ aka ‘the golden ratio’.  It’s found throughout history, where it has influenced architects and artists. We see it in nature, in plants, and it is used in movies to frame shots. It can be approximated by the Fibonacci sequence (another math favorite of mine). However, I have not worked out how to apply this to flow cytometry.  That doesn’t mean numbers aren’t important in flow cytometry. They are central to everything we do, and in this blog, I’m going to flit around numbers-based questions that I have received…

3 Must-Have High-Dimensional Flow Cytometry Controls

By: Tim Bushnell, PhD

Developments such as the recent upgrade to the Cytobank analysis platform and the creation of new packages such as Immunocluster are reducing the computational expertise needed to work with high-dimensional flow cytometry datasets. Whether you are a researcher in academia, industry, or government, you may want to take advantage of the reduced barrier to entry to apply high-dimensional flow cytometry in your work. However, you’ll need the right experimental design to access the new transformative insights available through these approaches and avoid wasting the considerable time and money required for performing them. As with all experiments, a good design begins…

The Fluorochrome Less Excited: How To Build A Flow Cytometry Antibody Panel

By: Tim Bushnell, PhD

Fluorochrome, antibodies and detectors are important. The journey of a thousand cells starts with a good fluorescent panel. The polychromatic panel is the combination of antibodies and fluorochromes. These will be used during the experiment to answer the biological question of interest. When you only need a few targets, the creation of the panel is relatively straightforward. It’s only when you start to get into more complex panels with multiple fluorochromes that overlap in excitation and emission gets more interesting.  FLUOROCHROMES Both full spectrum and traditional fluorescent flow cytometry rely on measuring the emission of the fluorochromes that are attached…

Flow Cytometry Year in Review: Key Changes To Know

By: Meerambika Mishra

Here we are, at the end of an eventful year 2021. But with the promise of a new year 2022 to come. It has been a long year, filled with ups and downs. It is always good to reflect on the past year as we move to the future.  In Memoriam Sir Isaac Newton wrote “If I have seen further, it is by standing upon the shoulders of giants.” In the past year, we have lost some giants of our field including Zbigniew Darzynkiwicz, who contributed much in the areas of cell cycle analysis and apoptosis. Howard Shapiro, known for…

What Star Trek Taught Me About Flow Cytometry

By: Tim Bushnell, PhD

It is no secret that I am a very big fan of the Star Trek franchise. There are many good episodes and lessons explored in the 813+ episodes, 12 movies (and counting). Don’t worry, this blog is not going to review all 813, or even 5 of them. Instead, some of the lessons I have taken away from the show that have applicability to science and flow cytometry.  “Darmok and Jalad at Tanagra.”  (ST:TNG season 5, episode 2) This is probably one of my favorite episodes, which involves Picard and an alien trying to establish a common ground and learn…

5 Flow Cytometry Strategies That Sun Tzu Taught Me

By: Tim Bushnell, PhD

Sun Tzu was a Chinese general and philosopher. His most famous writing is ‘The Art of War’, and has been studied by generals and CEOs, to glean ideas and strategies to help their missions. I was recently rereading this work and thought to myself if any of Sun Tzu’s lessons could apply to flow cytometry.  So I have identified 5 points that I think lend themselves to thinking about flow cytometry.  “Quickness is the essence of the war.” In flow cytometry, speed is of the essence. The longer the cells are out of their natural environment, the less happy they…

A Basic Guide To Flow Cytometry (3 Foundational Concepts)

By: Meerambika Mishra

Mastering foundational concepts are imperative for successfully using any technique or system.  Robert Heinlein introduced the term ‘Grok’  in his novel Stranger in a Strange Land. Ever since then it has made its way into popular culture. To Grok something is to understand it intuitively, fully. As a cytometrist, there are several key concepts that you must grok to be successful in your career. These foundational concepts are the key tools that we use day in and day out to identify and characterize our cells of interest.  Cells Flow cytometry measures biological processes at the whole cell level. To do…

How To Do Variant Calling From RNASeq NGS Data

By: Deepak Kumar, PhD

Developing variant calling and analysis pipelines for NGS sequenced data have become a norm in clinical labs. These pipelines include a strategic integration of several tools and techniques to identify molecular and structural variants. That eventually helps in the apt variant annotation and interpretation. This blog will delve into the concepts and intricacies of developing a “variant calling” pipeline using GATK. “Variant calling” can also be performed using tools other than GATK, such as FREEBAYES and SAMTOOLS.  In this blog, I will walk you through variant calling methods on Illumina germline RNASeq data. In the steps, wherever required, I will…

How small can you go? Flow cytometry of bacteria and viruses

By: Tim Bushnell, PhD

Flow cytometers are traditionally designed for measuring particles, like beads and cells. These tend to fall in the small micron size range. Looking at the relative size of different targets of biological interest, it is clear the most common targets for flow cytometry (cells) are comparatively large (figure 1). Figure 1:  Relative size of different biological targets of interest. Image modified from Bioninja.    In the visible spectrum, where most of the excitation light sources reside, it is clear the cells are larger than the light. This is important as one of the characteristics that we typically measure is the amount…

What Is Spectral Unmixing And Why It's Important In Flow Cytometry

By: Tim Bushnell, PhD

As the labeled cell passes through the interrogation point, it is illuminated by the excitation lasers. The fluorochromes, fluoresce; emitting photons of a higher wavelength than the excitation source. This is typically modeled using spectral viewers such as in the figure below, which shows the excitation (dashed lines) and emission (filled curves) for Brilliant Violet 421TM (purple) and Alexa Fluor 488Ⓡ (green).  Figure 1: Excitation and emission profiles of BV421TM and AF488Ⓡ  In traditional fluorescent flow cytometry (TFF), the instrument measures each fluorochrome off an individual detector. Since the detectors we use — photomultiplier tubes (PMT) and avalanche photodiodes (APD)…

How To Extract Cells From Tissues Using Laser Capture Microscopy

By: Tim Bushnell, PhD

Extracting specific cells still remains an important aspect of several emerging genomic techniques. Prior knowledge about the input cells helps to put the downstream results in context. The most common isolation technique is cell sorting, but it requires a single cell suspension and eliminates any spatial information about the microenvironment. Spatial transcriptomics is an emerging technique that can address some of these issues, but that is a topic for another blog.  So what does a researcher who needs to isolate a specific type of cell do? The answer lies in the technique of laser capture microdissection (LCM). Developed at the National…