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Written by Tim Bushnell, PhD Sheath fluid is the solution that runs in a flow cytometer.  Once the sheath fluid is running at laminar flow, the cells are injected into the center of the stream, at a slightly higher pressure.  The principles of hydrodynamic focusing cause the cells to align, single file in the direction…

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Written by Tim Bushnell, PhD In flow cytometry, cells, in suspension are moved from the tube to the interrogation point and finally into the waste (or to be sorted, but that is a different story).  To do this, the fluidics components of the flow cytometry are required. The fluidics are comprised of a running (or…

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Written by Tim Bushnell, PhD Do you know what an isotype control is? Isotype refers to the genetic variation in the heavy and light chains that make up the whole antibody moiety. In mammals, there are 9 possible heavy chain isotypes and two light chain isotypes. Every antibody will have a specific isotype, and this…

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Written by Tim Bushnell, PhD Titration is the process of identifying the best concentration to use an antibody for a given assay. While the vendor will provide a specific concentration to use, this may not be appropriate for your assay. Performing titration is a simple process: fix the cell concentration, the time of incubation, the…

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Written by Tim Bushnell, PhD Differential pressure based flow cytometers currently dominate the market. These systems have two pressure regulators. The first is at a constant pressure that sets how fast the fluids runs at. The second is regulated by the investigator (like as shown on this LSR-II control panel). As the sample pressure goes…

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